The Potatoes at
Sage Hen Farm


At Sage Hen Farm in Lodi, NY, we have planted many varieties of potatoes over the years, with the numbers and varieties changing each year. Listed here are the potatoes we have planted in 2015.

Please note: we sell potatoes locally only (Ithaca, Trumansburg, and Lodi, NY), and, as we are not certified, we do not sell seed potatoes.


Fingerling | Red & Rose | Blue/Purple | Yellow-fleshed | White-fleshed, including Russet


Potatoes by Season of Harvest
Harvest
Red & Rose
Blue
Yellow
White & Russet
Early

Dark Red Norland
Red Gold



Caribe
Yukon Gem
Early Ohio
Mid Adirondack Red
Chieftain
Desiree
Kerr's Pink
Purple Majesty
Purple Sun
Purple Viking
Pinto
Yellow Finn
Caribou Russet
Kennebec
Gold Rush
Mid-Late Strawberry Paw


Carola
 
Late Romanze
Magic Molly

Bintje
German Butterball
Elba
Fingerlings: Often harvested early for small finger-sized potatoes, most are actually late maturing.
Potatoes by Starch Content
Starch
Red & Rose
Blue
Yellow
White & Russet
Low (Waxy)

Adirondack Red
Dark Red Norland
French
Red Thumb
Strawberry Paw
Caribe
Magic Molly
Purple Sun

Austrian Crescent
Bintje
La Ratte
Rose Finn

Ozette
Medium
(Moist)
Chieftain
Dark Red Norland
Red Gold
Romanze
Purple Majesty
Bintje
Yellow Finn
Yukon Gem
Early Ohio
Elba
Medium High (Smooth)
Desiree
Purple Viking Anuschka
Carola
German Butterball
Pinto
Kennebec
High (Floury, Dry)
Kerr's Pink

Caribou Russet
Gold Rush
Green Mountain
See note on Uses for description of starch content. Note: starchy or not, all potatoes are gluten-free.


Fingerling
Variety
Origin
Color: Skin & Flesh
Shape
Starch
Harvest | Yield
Disease
Resistance
Images
Special Notes
Austrian Crescent
(Kipfel)

Austria/Germany
before 1850
yellow tan skin; light yellow flesh

crescent
low

mid to late

high
Low resistance to late blight and pink rot.
Adirondack Red

Noted for rich flavor. Grows quite close to the surface, so hill well to prevent greening in sunlight.
French
(Roseval, Nosebag)
France
introduced 1950
dark rose-red skin; yellow flesh with red streaks

rounder than other fingerlings
low

mid to late

 average
Moderate resistance to scab.

Noted for rich flavor. According to an old story, French fingerlings were smuggled into North America in a horse's nosebag.
Ozette
(Anna Cheeka's,
Makah Ozette)
Washington State
introduced in 1987
yellow tan skin with speckles; creamy white flesh

oblong to long
medium

early to late


low
High resistance to late blight. Ozette

Noted for earthy flavor. Discovered on the Olympic Peninsula. Speculation is that the first Ozettes were brought there by Spanish explorers from Peru before 1600.
La Ratte
(Corne de Mouton, Ram's Horn, Princess La Ratte)

France or Denmark
before 1875
yellow tan skin; yellow flesh

crescent
low

mid to late

high
Good resistance to scab.


Skin darkens from light yellow to a golden yellow in storage. Flavor has been called nutty, earthily sweet, buttery, and also likened to mushrooms.
Red Thumb
USA?
after 1990?
bright red skin; flesh varies from white with pink streaks to a deeper pink with red streaks [claims are for red flesh, but none of ours have fit that description]

oblong
medium

mid to late

 high
Moderate resistance to scab. Very reistant to early blight.

There is surprisingly little information available on when or where this variety was developed. Praised for producing potatoes of uniform shape and size. Although the flesh can be quite colorful when raw, the color will leach when boiled.
Rose Finn
(Rose Finn Apple,
Pink Fir Apple,
Rosa Tannenzapfen)

Germany
before 1850
light brown skin with pinkish mottling; yellow-gold flesh

long, knobbly, with nodes
low

mid to late

 average
High resistance to scab. Low resistance to late blight. Rose Finn

Noted for very rich flavor. "Finn Apple" appears to be a corrupted translation of fir-cone, which is somewhat resembles. It has a loyal following, despite or because of its knobbly shape.

See also Magic Molly in Blue/Purple.

Did you know? The name "fingerling" was used because the size and shape of the potatoes resembled the small, young fish used by hatcheries for stocking ponds and streams, which in term were called fingerlings because of their resemblance to fingers.

Because of fingerlings shape and size, they can be extra work in preparing, but their extra flavor and firm texture make them a first choice for roasting. They cook well when steamed or boiled, so they are also excellent for making potato salad.

Red & Rose
Variety
Origin
Color: Skin & Flesh
Shape
Starch
Harvest | Yield
Disease
Resistance
Images
Special Notes
Adirondack Red
(was T17-2)
New York
introduced  2004
purplish red skin; pinkish red flesh

oblong
low

early to mid


medium high
Moderate resistance to common scab and golden nemotode.
Adirondack Red

Developed at Cornell for its red flesh. Keeps color after cooking; turns pink when mashed.
Desiree
Netherlands
introduced 1952
pink to reddish skin with dark spots; light yellow flesh

oval to oblong
medium high

mid


high
Moderate resistance to late blight and common scab. Desiree

Noted for a special "gourmet" flavor. The most widely grown red potato in Europe.
Kerr's Pink
Scotland
introduced 1907
light brown skin, with pink highlights; creamy white flesh

flat oval
high

mid


high
Low resistance to late blight.
Good resistance to common scab.
Yukon Gem

Noted for very rich flavor.  Grown widely throughout the British Isles;  second most widely grown variety in Ireland.
Red Gold
(Red River Gold)

Ontario
introduced 1987
pinkish red skin; yellow flesh

round to oval
medium

early

high
Moderate resistance to common scab. Yukon Gem

Noted for rich flavor. Produces lots of small to medium tubers. Somewhat blight resistant.
Red Maria
(was NY 129)
New York
introduced  2011
bright, deep red skin; white flesh

round
medium

late


high
High resistance to common scab and golden nemotode.
Red Maria

Developed at Cornell for blight resistance, high yield and uniformity of shape and size.
Romanze
(Romanz)

Germany
introduced 1973
red skin; yellow flesh

oval to long
medium

late

average
High resistance to late blight
Noted for rich flavor. Developed for its brillant red skin and brillant yellow flesh. The brillance, however, is variable. Our original supplier no longer sells this variety, so we've been trying to keep Romanze going on our own.
Strawberry Paw
(was NY 136)

New York
introduced 2013
dark red skin; white flesh

oval to long
medium

late

average
High resistance to late blight Strawberry Paw

Very recent Cornell release. Developed for blight and scab resistanceits plus an exceptionally dark red skin. Good flavor.

See also French in Fingerling


Red-skinned potatoes in general are low starch varieties, so they are best when boiled, steamed, sauteed, and roasted. That makes them an excellent choice for soups and potato salads, and as scalloped potatoes

Blue/Purple
Variety
Origin
Color: Skin & Flesh
Shape
Starch
Harvest | Yield
Disease
Resistance
Images
Special Notes
Magic Molly
Alaska
introduced 2012
deep purple skin; deep purple flesh

oblong
medium

late

low
Vigorous, but resistance to most diseases unknown.
Magic Molly

D
eveloped in Alaska in the race for the deepest blue flesh and for a purple potato that keeps its color when boiled. Tuber size varies. Considered a fingerling by some.
Purple Majesty
Colorado
introduced 2005
purple skin; purple flesh

oblong
medium

mid

average

 Good resistance to late blight; high resistance to common scab.

Purple Majesty

Developed in Colorado State in the race for the deepest blue flesh.
Purple Sun
(Peter Wilcox,
Blue Gold)

Maryland
introduced 2007
purple skin; yellow flesh

round to oblong
medium

mid

low

 Low resistance to late blight; good resistance to common scab.

Purple Sun

Developed for its beautifully textured deep purple skin over golden flesh. It was originally named for a professor of religion at Loyola University in Baltimore.
Purple Viking
North Dakota
after 1963
splotchy purple over pink skin; white flesh

round to oblong
medium  high

mid

high

Low resistance to late blight; high resistance to common scab.

 

Mutant of the Viking, a red skin potato, which was developed in 1963. Known for producing only a few, but  enormous tubers. 
Tends to sprout in storage.
See also Purple Peruvian in Fingerling

Did you know? The purple/blue color comes from polyphenols, specifically the anthocyanins, the same flavonoid that gives blueberries their color and gives both the same powerful antioxidant property.

As a group, blue potatoes fit right in the middle between moist and dry, which puts them square in middle of the all-purpose category. Their color and bolder earthy flavor, however, make for special challenges or an opportunities. Some folks think blue mashed potatoes are the coolest thing, but others might not find them appealing at all. They stand up well with foods with fuller flavor and extra seasoning. Many folks like to use them in combination with red and white potatoes, for a more colorful presentation.

Yellow-fleshed
Variety
Origin
Color: Skin & Flesh
Shape
Starch
Harvest | Yield
Disease
Resistance
Images
Special Notes
Carola
Germany
introduced 1979
yellow tan skin; light yellow flesh

oblong
medium

mid

high
Moderate resistance to late blight; high resistance to scab. Carola

Noted for rich flavor. Grows quite close to the surface, so hill well to prevent greening in sunlight. We've eaten potatoes from previous year's crop after we've started to harvest a new crop.
German Butterball
Germany?
unknown
(20th century?)
rough yellow tan skin; bright or dark yellow flesh

oval to oblong
(not round as the name might suggest)
medium high

late

high
Moderately good resistance to late blight and pink rot. Good resistance to scab. col, cur, ogr, ont

Noted for rich flavor, called best flavored potato by several sources. There are claims that it is a heirloom variety, and a German friend remembers a potato like the German Butterball when she was growing up, but its origin is hard to trace earlier than the 1980s. Known for developing many small tubers. 
Yellow Finn
uncertain
unknown
yellowy skin, light to dark yellow flesh

round to pear-shaped, occasionally flattened
medium

mid

average
Good resistance to scab. Yellow Finn

Noted for rich flavor. Both France and the USA have been named as place of origin. It is an old enough cultivar that no one owns royalty rights. Expect a high percentage of small tubers. 
Yukon Gem
Idaho
introduced 2006
yellow tan skin with pink spots around the eyes, light yellow flesh

round to oval
low

early

above average
Good resistance to scab. Yukon Gem

Developed for blight resistance and dry rot. A cross between Yukon Gold and Brodick, a Scottish potato. Richly flavored. 

See also Austrian Crescent and Rose Finn in Fingerling, and Desiree, Red Gold & Romanze in Red & Rose

Did you know? The yellow flesh color comes from beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, the same carotenoids that give egg yolks and corn their color and give them all the same powerful antioxidant property.

Yellows are potatoes with various shades of yellow flesh, from almost creamy white to almost the color of an egg yolk. The extra color translates to being more nutritious and more flavorful than most white fleshed potatoes. Perhaps it is the power of suggestion, but "buttery" seems a common description for their taste. Carola and German Butterball have regularly won taste tests we have held in recent years.

White-fleshed, including Russet
Variety
Origin
Color: Skin & Flesh
Shape
Starch
Harvest | Yield
Disease
Resistance
Images (or Links to Images)
Special Notes
Caribou Russet
Maine
introduced 2016
light russet skin; very white flesh

long oblong

hgh

late

excellent

Resistance to early and late blight being tested. High resistance to hollow heart, rot, and scab.


Developed
to be a high-yielding russet with hollow heart resistance.
Gold Rush
(Goldrush)

North Dakota
introduced 1992
light russet skin; very white flesh

oblong

hgh

mid

excellent

Low resistance to early and late blight, and rot. High resistance to hollow heart and scab.
Gold Rush

Developed
to improve on the Russet Burbank, especially in higher yield and better resistance to hollow heart .
Early Ohio
Vermont
introduced 1871
light tan, with occasional pink patches; white flesh

round
medium high

early


average
Moderately resistance to late blight, common scab
Not from Ohio. It has been credited with being the first potato grown specifically for baking, but it is not an especially starchy potato. We think it the most flavorful of white-fleshed potatoes.
Kennebec
Maine
introduced 1948
light tan; white flesh

oblong
medium high

mid

high
Moderately resistance to late blight. Low resistance to common scab.
Known for its papery skin. Spuds can grow very large. Once the most used potato for potato chips, but replaced by better storing potatoes with more uniform size.

See also Ozette in Fingerling

Did you know? White-fleshed potatoes are lower in sugar content than most other potatoes. This as much as the high starch content is what makes them excellent for frying, since higher levels of sugars can darken or even blacken pototoes.

Brown-skinned potatoes, from the light brown "whites" to the rough-skinned, darker brown russets, are what most people think of when they think of potatoes and, due to their high starch content, are the first choice for baked potatoes.

 

Notes

Uses:

  • Low starch (waxy) stay firm and hold their shape well after cooking. Studies have shown that by content they are 13-15% starch. They are excellent boiled or roasted and the best potatoes to use for potato salad. Waxy potatoes can become too gluey for mashing and won't be fluffy when baked.
  • Medium starch (moist) potatoes are versatile, all purpose potatoes (15-17% starch). Their moist, smooth texture make them great when cooked many different ways: boiled, steamed, mashed, roasted, and fried, and can also be used in potato salad or baked.
  • Medium high starch (smooth) potatoes are also versatile, all purpose potatoes (17-20% starch). Their smooth texture make them great when cooked many different ways, but their texture makes them just right for potato chips and fries. Better than medium starch potatoes for baking and mashing.
  • High starch (dry) potatoes have a light, mealy, fluffy, or floury texture when cooked, but do not hold their shape well (20-22% starch). Also called mealy or starchy. They are best for baking, mashing, and as fries.

Flavor:

Potatoes from your garden or local farmers market will be more flavorful than the potatoes that you find in the super market. This is due in part to the varieties available, but also to how they are grown, and, in season, their freshness. Descriptions used to describe the tastes of different potato varieties are pretty limited, but within the range of "potatoey" are earthy, buttery, nutty, smooth, creamy, and sweet or almost sweet. In terms of amount of flavor, the potatoes above also range from mild (aka bland) to rich. How a potato is cooked and how it is served, however, will make a tremendous difference in how it tastes. Mashed potatoes loaded on with gravy won't allow much of the potato flavor to come through. Roasted or baked potatoes with little more than salt and pepper and butter will permit some varieties of potatoes to excel.

Harvest:

Potato varieties have been assigned a category of early, mid, and late. Depending on where you live and what a particular season's growing conditions have been, the number of days will widely vary. Early varieties may be harvested between 55 and 80 days. Mid-season varieties can be harvested in between 70 days to 110 days. Late potatoes mature in a range from 100 days to 130 days or longer.

Don't harvest by the calendar alone. With early potatoes, you can start pretty much as soon as they look large enough to eat. You will have to decide on the trade-off between the pleasure of new potatoes sooner and larger potatoes later. The plants themselves will be a good guide for the best time to harvest. Watch for the vines to die back, and then give them another week to so to start reaping the bounty. Especially for late varieties, you should wait as long as you can to allow the starch to be fully formed, both for flavor and better storage. So as long as the plant is alive and there is no frost warnings, let them grow.

Yield:

The potential to produce tubers ranked low, average, and high. There are too many variables for me to assign pounds and kilograms per plant. Some years, our high yielding potatoes have barely exceeded 4 lbs. (2 kg) per plant and other years have easily exceeded 10 lbs. (4.5 kg).

Storage:

Some sources list the storage qualities of the different potato varieties, but in general, early varieties do not store as well as late varieties. A related factor is dormancy, meaning how likely the spuds are likely to sprout during storage. Only varieties with exceptional poor dormancy (most likely to sprout) are noted above.

Disease resistance levels:

The range is very low, low, moderate, good, and high. I am uncertain how well most varieties have been tested, and for some varieties very different resistamce levels have been reported.

Links:

The following site have been useful in compiling the information about potato varieties. Most have photographs of the various varieties, as well.

This page written and maintained by John R. Henderson (jhenderson @ icyousee.org). Last modified: May 26, 2017
Photo of the giant potato by Paul Ievins.
URL: http://www.sagehenfarmlodi.com/potato.html