Hewes Crab blossom The Orchard at Sage Hen Farm:
Peaches and Plums

Descriptions of 10 peach and 3 plum varieties presently growing in our orchard in Lodi, NY.


For descriptions of other fruit trees grown at Sage Hen Farm, go to our pages for apples, pears, and cherries.

NOTE: there used to be descriptions of several apricot trees on this page, but we have had no success. Our last surviving apricot tree, an Adirondack Gold, blossomed, but never fruited for about seven years. It did not survive the winter of 2015-16, but a sucker did. If it ever matures and produces fruit, a description will return.


Peaches
Contender, Finger Lakes Super Hardy, Garnet Beauty, Glowing Star, Madison, Redhaven, Rochester, Saturn, Veteran
(listed in order of harvest, below)
Variety
Origin
Date
Fruit
Size
Skin Flesh

Bloom

Harvest

Rootstock
&
Hardiness
Year 

Merits & Faults

Harrow Diamond
(Redskin x Harbinger)
Ontario, released in 1984
small to medium predominantly red over yellow red bleeding into deep yellow, firm, slow or non-browning; freestone

late April into May


2 weeks before Redhaven

to z4
Halford

2011

tree: medium vigor; light cropper; susceptible to peach leaf curl; somewhat disease resistant

fruit: less sweet, rather acidic for a peach

Garnet Beauty
(Redhaven bud mutant)
Ontario, discovered in 1951, released in 1958
large to very large predominantly red over yellow yellow, firm, non-browning, semi-freestone

late April into May


1-2 weeks before Redhaven

to z5
Halford

2009
first fruit 2013
tree: naturally large; somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl 

fruit: very similar to Red Haven

Redhaven
(Hale Haven x Kalhaven)
Michigan, developed 1940, introduced 1948

medium predominantly red over golden yellow yellow with red around pit, very firm, non-browning, semi-freestone

late April into May


usually around the third week of August

to z5
Halford

2005, 2007
, 2015

 

tree: naturally large, heavy cropper (needs thinning); somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl

fruit: became the standard for flavor and juiciness almost since it was introduced

Saturn
or Doughnut

(cold-hardy strain of Peento)
NJ, introduced 1990; first Peento was imported from China in 1869.
small, very oblate white, with red blush; little fuzz usually; skin peels easily white, soft, freestone

mid April into May


just after Radhaven

to z5
Halford 

2008

tree: very heavy cropper; fruit does not hang well; somewhat disease resistant

fruit: very sweet – some complain too sweet and not enough peach flavor, some describe a hint of almond

Rochester
(Early Crawford x open pollinated)
NY 1900

variable, medium to large red over yellow yellow, browns quickly, medium soft, freestone to semi-freestone

late April into May


2 weeks after Redhaven

to z4
standard

2008
first fruit 2013

tree: naturally large, upright spreading; susceptible to peach leaf curl

fruit: classic peach flavor

Special: more popular in England than in US; since Miller's merged with Stark Bros, I've been told Rochester is almost impossible to find any more in the US.

Finger Lakes Super Hardy
(developed by Miller Nurseries)
Canandaigua, NY
small to medium red-orange over yellow yellow, non-browning, freestone

late April into May


2-3 weeks after Redhaven

to z4
standard

2008
first fruit 2013

tree: naturally small; susceptible to peach leaf curl.

fruit: sweet and very juicy

Special: since Miller's merged with Stark Bros, I've been told the FLSH may be no longer available.

Contender
(Summercrest x Redhaven)

N.C. 1987

med to large predominantly red over yellow yellow, firm, non-browning, freestone

early May


3 weeks after Redhaven

to z4
Halford 

2008

tree: naturally small, reliable, heavy cropper; somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl, somewhat disease resistant.

fruit: has been called the "most flavorful, fresh eating peach" 

Veteran
(Early Elberta x Vaughn)
Canada 1928
medium to large yellow to yellow-orange, with little red; heavy fuzz, skin peels easily yellow, browns quickly, soft, freestone to semi-freestone

late April into May


3 weeks after Redhaven

to z4
Halford

2007
first fruit 2013
tree: naturally large; dependable cropper; susceptible to peach leaf curl.

fruit: known as a canning peach, indicating lower rating for flavor as fresh eating, but right off the tree, it is quite rich and peachy.

 
Glowing Star
(from Stellar series)
Michigan, post-1990
medium large predominantly bright red yellow, firm, non-browning, freestone

April 27 (est.)


3-4 weeks after Redhaven

to z5
Halford 

2009
first fruit 2013
tree: naturally large, fruit hangs well; susceptible to peach leaf curl.

fruit: good balance of sweet and acid; less juicy

Madison
(open pollinated x Redhaven)
Virginia 1963

medium bright red, little fuzz orange yellow, browns quickly, very firm but tender, freestone

late April into May


3-4 weeks after Redhaven

to z4
Halford 

2007, 2015
tree: naturally large; hardy;  somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl; somewhat disease resistant.

fruit: rich flavor, less juicy

I wonder why heirloom peach trees disappeared when heirloom apple trees have thrived. Our only peach that dates back to 1917 when U.P. Hedrick's The Peaches of New York was published is the Rochester. I know some factors are the preference for freestone over cling, yellow fleshed over white fleshed, and (oddly to me) very red-skinned over peach-colored. I would be interested in obtaining an Early Crawford, Late Crawford, Old Mixson Free, J.H. Hale, Stump the World, and Yellow Rareripe, but they are either rare or not available from nurseries I know of.

Living in a frost pocket in an otherwise Zone 5 area, we do not expect a peach crop every year – or even every other year. We had a major winter kill of peach trees in 2015. We lost Eden, Madison, Reliance, and Red Haven. Other peach trees all re-leafed. By 2016 we had replaced the Red Haven and Madison, but lost the Loring, and had no blossoms beyond a very few from the Saturn.




Plums
Variety
Origin
Date
Type
Fruit
Size & Shape
Skin Flesh Bloom Harvest Merits & Faults
Green Gage
(Reine Claude)
France/England
1500s

European/Gage
small
roundish
green, often with russeting translucent yellow-green
late April
not self fertile
early September
Good cropper; poor disease resistance; flavor is both rich and extremely sweet; prone to splitting after rain; soft, juicy flesh; does not keep well; freestone.
Long John
NY
1993

European
large
long, somwhat flattened
blackish purple red late April
not self fertile
early September (for full flavor)
Vertical grower; late maturing; naturally thinning (drops many small fruits); flavor good to very good; firm flesh; good keeper for a plum; freestone.
Mount Royal
Quebec
discovered 1913

E
uropean
medium
roundish
bluish black orange-yellow late April
self fertile
late Aug to early Sept

Hardiest plum; naturally semi-dwarf; heavy cropper; requires thinning; good disease resistance; rich, sweet flavor; juicy; clingtone.
We may not be in the right climate for plums. Trees we have tried to grow but have not thrived include Fortune, Toka, South Dakota, Stanley, Underwood, Oullins, Yakima, Empress. This past winter the Castleton that we planted in 2005 died.

 

This page written and maintained by John R. Henderson [orchard @ sagehenfarmlodi.com].
Last modified: November 1, 2016
URL: http://www.sagehenfarmlodi.com/ourother.html