Hewes Crab blossom The Orchard at Sage Hen Farm:
Peaches, Plums, and Cherries

Descriptions of varieties presently growing in our orchard in Lodi, NY.


Peaches | Plums | Cherries

For descriptions of other fruit trees grown at Sage Hen Farm, go to our pages for apples and pears.

NOTE: Growing peaches in a frost pocket in the Finger Lakes region of New York State has been a challenge. We do not expect peach harvests every year, and we do not expect bountiful peach harvests more than once in three to five years. We have been less successful with plums. Tart cherries have succeeded pretty well, but sweet cherries have not. Although we have tried to grow several apricot varieties, our only surviving apricot tree, an Adirondack Gold, described as self-fertile and filled with blossoms every early spriong, has never fruited. If we ever get fruit from it, we may add a description.


Peaches
Contender, Garnet Beauty, Glowing Star, Madison, Redhaven, Rochester, Saturn, Veteran
(listed below in order of harvest)
Variety
Origin
Date
Fruit
Size
Skin Flesh

Bloom

Harvest

Rootstock
&
Hardiness
Year 

Merits & Faults

Harrow Diamond
(Redskin x Harbinger)
Ontario, released in 1984
small to medium predominantly red over yellow red bleeding into deep yellow, firm, slow or non-browning; freestone

late April into May


usually around August 4

to z4
Halford

2011

tree: medium vigor; light cropper; susceptible to peach leaf curl; somewhat disease resistant

fruit: less sweet, rather acidic for a peach

Garnet Beauty
(Redhaven bud mutant)
Ontario, discovered in 1951, released in 1958
large to very large predominantly red over yellow yellow, firm, non-browning, semi-freestone

late April into May


usually around August 8

to z5
Halford

2009
first fruit 2013
tree: naturally large; somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl 

fruit: very similar to Red Haven

Redhaven
(Hale Haven x Kalhaven)
Michigan, developed 1940, introduced 1948

medium predominantly red over golden yellow yellow with red around pit, very firm, non-browning, semi-freestone

late April into May


usually around August 15

to z5
Halford

2005, 2007
, 2015

 

tree: naturally large, heavy cropper (needs thinning); somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl

fruit: became the standard for flavor and juiciness almost since it was introduced

Saturn
(Doughnut
)
(cold-hardy strain of Peento)
NJ, introduced 1990; first Peento was imported from China in 1869.
small, very oblate white, with red blush; little fuzz usually; skin peels easily white, soft, freestone

mid April into May


usually around August 15

to z5
Halford 

2008

tree: very heavy cropper; fruit does not hang well; somewhat disease resistant

fruit: very sweet – some complain too sweet and not enough peach flavor, some describe a hint of almond

Rochester
(Early Crawford x open pollinated)
NY 1900

variable, medium to large red over yellow yellow, browns quickly, medium soft, freestone to semi-freestone

late April into May


usually around August 30

to z4
standard

2008
first fruit 2013

tree: naturally large, upright spreading; susceptible to peach leaf curl

fruit: classic peach flavor

Special: more popular in England than in US; since Miller's merged with Stark Bros, I've been told Rochester is almost impossible to find any more in the US.

Contender
(Summercrest x Redhaven)

N.C. 1987

Lodi apple

med to large predominantly red over yellow yellow, firm, non-browning, freestone

early May


usually around September 4

to z4
Halford 

2008

tree: naturally small, reliable, heavy cropper; somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl, somewhat disease resistant.

fruit: has been called the "most flavorful, fresh eating peach" 

Veteran
(Early Elberta x Vaughn)
Vineland, Ontario
1928
medium to large yellow to yellow-orange, with little red; heavy fuzz, skin peels easily yellow, browns quickly, soft, freestone to semi-freestone

late April into May


usually around September 7

to z4
Halford

2007
first fruit 2013
tree: naturally large; dependable cropper; susceptible to peach leaf curl.

fruit: known as a canning peach, indicating lower rating for flavor as fresh eating, but right off the tree, it is quite rich and peachy.

 
Glowing Star
(from Stellar series)
Michigan, post-1990


Lodi apple
medium large predominantly bright red yellow, firm, non-browning, freestone

April 27 (est.)


usually around September 10

to z5
Halford 

2009
first fruit 2013
tree: naturally large, fruit hangs well; susceptible to peach leaf curl.

fruit: good balance of sweet and acid; less juicy

Madison
(Redhaven open pollinated)
Virginia 1963

medium bright red, little fuzz orange yellow, browns quickly, very firm but tender, freestone

late April into May


usually around September 10

to z5
Halford 

2007, 2015
tree: naturally large; hardy;  somewhat less susceptible to peach leaf curl; somewhat disease resistant.

fruit: rich flavor, less juicy



Plums
Variety
Origin
Date
Type
Fruit
Size & Shape
Skin Flesh Bloom Harvest Merits & Faults
Castleton
NY
introduced 1994

E
uropean
medium
ovate
blue yellow-green late April
partially self fertile
late August
Heavy cropper; complex flavor, sweet with a bit of sharpness; drops fruit, especially first few years; colors early before full ripe; firm flesh; good keeper for a plum; freestone.
Green Gage
(Reine Claude)
France/England
1500s

European/Gage
small
roundish
green, often with russeting translucent yellow-green
late April
not self fertile
early September
Good cropper; poor disease resistance; flavor is both rich and extremely sweet; prone to splitting after rain; soft, juicy flesh; does not keep well; freestone.
Myrobalan
Western Asia
this century

Cherry Plum
small
roundish
yellow yellow late April
not self fertile
late Aug to early Sept

Hardy; heavy cropper; requires thinning; good disease resistance; rich, sweet flavor; juicy; freestone.
Lavina
Lithuania
this century

Asian
small
roundish
yellow yellow late April
not self fertile
late Aug to early Sept

Hardy; heavy cropper; requires thinning; good disease resistance; rich, sweet flavor; juicy; freestone.


Cherries
Tart: Balaton, English Morello, Evans, Garfield Plantation, Montmorency.
Sweet: Emperor Francis, Kristin
(listed below in order of harvest)
Variety
Origin
Date
Fruit Size & Flavor Skin Flesh

Bloom

Harvest

Merits & Faults
Montmorency
France, before 1600
introduced to North America before 1830

Tart
medium
mildly tart
bright red firm, amber fruit, pinkish clear juice

first of May


early to mid July
Tree: medium-sized; self-fertile; heavy cropper; resistant to brown rot & other diseases; very hardy. Fruit: very juicy

Evans (Bali)
Alberta, rediscovered and introduced in 1976
Evans cherry tree Evans cherries

Tart

large
sweet-tart
bright red semi-firm, translucent yellow flesh, pinkish clear juice

early May


early to mid July, later for sweeter cherries
Tree: naturally small, vigorous growth, self-fertile, heavy cropper, very hardy, susceptible to cherry leaf spot, frequent suckering. Fruit: thick skinned, not as juicy
Garfield Plantation
Maine, date
unknown, rediscovered and introduced by Fedco after 2000

Tart
medium
tart
orange red firm, red juice early May
mid-July
Tree: naturally small, self-fertile, heavy cropper, very hardy, frequent suckering. Fruit: juicy
Balaton
Hungary, tested in Michigan
introduced to US in 1984, commerically released in 2001

Tart
large
rich, sweet-tart
dark burgundy firm, red juice early May
mid-July
Tree: naturally small, self-fertile, hardy. Fruit: not as juicy

Emperor Francis 
Austria (?), before 1800, introduced to North America in the 19th Centur
y

Sweet

large
sweet, with some tart
marbled red on yellow firm, clear juice

early to mid May


mid July
Tree: naturally large; very productive, reliable cropper; quite resistant to cracking. Fruit: juicy

Kristin 
(Emperor Francis x Gil Peck)
NY, developed in 1938, tested in Norway
1969-1981, introduced 1982 

Sweet

medium large
sweet
very dark red or purplish black firm, red juice

early to mid May


mid July
Tree: very hardy; naturally large; very productive, reliable cropper; moderately resistant to cracking. Fruit: juicy, richly aromatic

English Morello
England, before 1600, introduced to North America before 1860

Tart

medium
sharply tart
dark red to black semi-firm, dark red juice

early to mid May


mid to late July
Tree: naturally small, self-fertile, heavy cropper, hardy. Fruit: very juicy

For cherries, large is 1" or more, medium around 3/4 inch. Most sweet cherries are not self-pollinating abd don't pollinate with several other varieties, so having a Montmorency around makes life easier.

 

This page written and maintained by John R. Henderson [jhenderson @ ithaca.edu].
Last modified: August 3, 2018

URL: http://www.sagehenfarmlodi.com/ourother.html