Hewes Crab blossom The Orchard at Sage Hen Farm: Peaches

Descriptions of varieties presently growing in our orchard in Lodi, NY.



Our Peaches include these varieties:
Contender, Early Crawford, Garnet Beauty, Glowing Star, Harrow Diamond, George IV, Late Crawford, Madison, Oldmixon Free, Redhaven, Rochester, Saturn, Veteran

They are listed below in order of harvest.

For descriptions of other fruit trees grown at Sage Hen Farm, go to our pages forApples, Pears, Plums & Cherries.

Variety
Origin
Date
Fruit
Size
Skin Flesh
&
Flavor

Bloom
Harvest
Tree Vigor
Hardiness

Tree
Merits & Faults

Harrow Diamond
(Redskin x Harbinger)
Agriculture Canada, Harrow, Ontario, released in 1984

small to medium

round

predominantly red over yellow

red bleeding into deep yellow, firm, semi-freestone, medium firmness


less sweet, rather acidic for a modern peach, juicy

late April


August 4


T2


z4

Merits: bud hardy; showy blooms; slow or non-browning fruit; moderately resistant to bacterial spot.
Faults: susceptible to peach leaf curl

Garnet Beauty
(Redhaven bud mutant)
Ruthven, Ontario, discovered by Garnet Bruner in 1951, released by Agriculture Canada in 1958

large to very large

round

predominantly red over yellow yellow, very firm, semi-freestone
full flavored (similar to Red Haven, but not as sweet), juicy

late April into May


August 5-8


T3
z5

Merits: bud hardy; showy blooms; non-browning fruit; reliable, productive; less susceptible to peach leaf curl moderately resistant to bacterial spot.
Faults: susceptible to peach leaf curl

Redhaven
(Hale Haven x Kalhaven)
East Lansing, Michigan, developed 1940, introduced by Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, 1948

medium

round with suture

predominantly red over golden yellow yellow with red around pit, very firm, semi-freestone
sweet, full flavored, very juicy

late April into May


August 15


T3
z5

Merits: bud hardy; very productive (needs thinning); non-browning fruit; moderately resistant to bacterial spot
Faults: susceptible to peach leaf curl

Special: the standard for flavor and juiciness for more than half a century

Saturn
(Donut
)
(parentage includes Golden Globe, Early Hale, and a Yugoslavian Peento)
New Brunswick, NJ, introduced by New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station,1990 in conjunction with Stark Brothers of Missouri.

small

very flat

white, with red blush; little fuzz usually; skin peels easily

white, soft, freestone


honey sweet, low acid, without much peach flavor, less juicy

mid April into May


August 15


T2


z5

Merits: showy blooms; non-browning fruit; some resistance to peach leaf curl; resistant to bacterial spot.
Faults: tardy in bearing; fruit does not hang well

Rochester
(Early Crawford x open pollinated)
Rochester, NY 1900

Rochester peach

variable, medium to very large

round with suture

red over yellow

yellow, medium soft, freestone to semi-freestone


classic peach flavor (less sweet than most modern peaches), juicy

late April into May


August 30


T3
z4

Merits: bud hardy; moderately resistant to bacterial spot.
Faults: fruit browns quickly; susceptible to peach leaf curl

Special: more popular in England than in US; was the most popular peach on the Puget Sound islands during the early 20th Century; very rare in the US.

Contender
(Winblo x NC64 [parentage of NC64 includes Summercrest and Redhaven])

Raleigh, N.C. Introduced by North Carolina Agricultural Research Service in1987

Contender peach

medium to large

round

orange-red over yellow

light yellow, firm, freestone


has been called the "most flavorful, fresh eating peach," very juicy 

early May


September 4


T1


z4

Merits: bud hardy; reliable & productive; non-browning fruit; aromatic; moderately resistant to bacterial spot.
Faults: susceptible to peach leaf curl

Special: considered the best of all northern peach varieties

 

Early Crawford
(Crawford's Early Melocoton)

(unknown parentage)
Middleton, NJ, introduced by William Crawford in 1840?

medium

prominent tip and suture

yellow, very little red; heavy fuzz

yellow, low to medium firmness, freestone


classic peach flavor (less sweet than most modern peaches), juicy

late April into May


September 5


T3


z5

Merits: moderately resistant to bacterial spot.
Faults: tardy in bearing; rather unproductive; fruit browns quickly; susceptible to peach leaf curl

Special: considered the best of all early peaches for most of the 19th century

Variety
Origin
Date
Fruit
Size
Skin Flesh
&
Flavor

Bloom
Harvest
Tree Vigor
Hardiness

Tree
Merits & Faults

Veteran
(Vaughn x Early Elberta)
Veteran peach Vineland, Ontario, introduced by the Horticultural Research Institute of Ontario in 1928

medium to large

flatter than round

yellow to yellow-orange, with little red; heavy fuzz, skin peels easily

yellow, soft, more semi-freestone than freestone


quite a rich flavor, juicy

late April


September 7


T3


z4

Merits: bud hardy; showy blooms; reliable, usually very productive;moderately resistant to bacterial spot.
Faults: susceptible to peach leaf curl

Special: considered tpo be better for canning than fresh eating, and although it is usually rated as only fair in flavor, we've enjoyed its fruits right off the tree. Perhaps we are in just the right climate for it
.

Madison
(Ideal x Redhaven)
Blacksburg, Va, introduced by Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in 1963

medium

round with prominent tip and suture

bright red over greenish yellow, little fuzz

orange yellow with red near pit, moderately firm, tender, freestone


rich flavor, only moderately juicy

May


September 10


T3
z4

Merits: very bud hardy; precocious bearer; resistant to bacterial spot; resistant to peach leaf curl
Faults: fruit browns quickly; susceptible to peach leaf curl

George IV
(George the Fourth)

(unknown parentage)
New York City, introduced by Mr. Gill of Broad Street in 1821

 

medium

flatter than round

creamy white with pink or reddish blush, little fuzz

whitish, tinged with red near the pit, soft & tender, free to semi-freestone


"rich, luscious flavor," very juicy

May


September 14


T3


z5

Merits: highly aromatic; moderately resistant to bacterial spot and peach leaf curl
Faults: very unproductive

Special: discounted by Hedrick in Peaches of New York (1917) as of historical interest only

Oldmixon Free
(Old Mixon Free)

(Oldmixon Cling x open pollinated)
Uncertain. Tree or seed of Oldmixon Cling brought to America cirxa 1820.
Oldmixon Free first mentioned in 1832.

large

round with some tip

creamy white overspread with lively red blush and darker red splashes, coarse fuzz

white, moderately firm but tender, freestone


quite sweet, spritely

May


October 8


T3


z4

Merits: very bud hardy; moderately resistant to bacterial spot and peach leaf curl
Faults: usually rather unproductive

Special: There is an origin story that the first Oldmixon peach was planted by Sir John Oldmixon the pamphleteer and historian, but he died in 1742 and never traveled to the New World. It may have been brought to America by an unrelated John Oldmixon who died in America in 1818, but the peach is more likely to have been named in honor the old Whig polemicist, instead.

Late Crawford
(Crawford's Late Melocoton)

(unknown parentage)
Middleton, NJ, introduced by William Crawford in 1840?

large

ovate with unequal halves and with prominent suture and tip

deep yellow with red blush, little fuzz

orange yellow, strongly stained with red near the pit, firm but tender, freestone


"unequaled in richness of flavor," "sweet but spritely" [tarter than most modern peaches]; very juicy

May


October 8


T3


z5

Merits: aromatic
Faults: tardy in bearing; rather unproductive; susceptable to bacterial spot.

Special: the standard of quality for yellow peaches for most of the 19th century


NOTES:

Bloom and Harvest: Bloom dates are vague, but since the earliest and latest blossoming trees have overlapped, I haven't paid as much attention to the actual dates. Harvest dates are not as exact as they may appear. They are based on the average date, August 15, that we have picked Red Haven peaches, and the number or days before or after the other varieties are usually ripe.

Tree Vigor and Hardiness: Vigor means how large or small the tree will grow. T3 are larger trees that can reach 20 feet without dwarfing rootstock or regular pruning. T1 are naturally dwarfing trees that may only reach 8 to 10 feet even without dwarfing rootstock or pruning. Hardiness is based on how likely the tree will thrive based on the average annual minimum winter temperature using the 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map as a guide. Zone 4's range is -20 to -30 (Fahrenheit) or -28.9 to -34.4 (Celsius). Zone 5's range is -10 to -20 (Fahrenheit) or -23.3 to-28.9 (Celsius). However, growing peaches in a frost pocket in the Finger Lakes region of New York State has been a challenge. We do not expect peach harvests every year, and we do not expect bountiful peach harvests more than once in three to five years.

Other Peach Trees: We have tried growing other varieties of peaches, Eden, Finger Lakes Super Hardy, Glowingstar, Hale Haven, Loring, and Reliance. Finger Lakes Super Hardy has not been available since Stark Brothers took over the Miller Nursery of Canandaigua, NY, which had been the exclusive proprietor of that variety. I'm not sure the reason ours died (we tried twice), probably not because of lack of hardiness. Its fruits were fine but not outstanding.

 


 

Resources:

This page written and maintained by John R. Henderson [jhenderson @ ithaca.edu].
Last modified: Vernal Equinox 2019

URL: http://www.sagehenfarmlodi.com/peach.html